Have you ever felt unmotivated?

As much as I believe I would enjoy lucid dreaming, the dreams I currently have are hilarious. I don’t think I would ever want to be rid of normal dreams 100%. Plus, it’s too often that I’ll wish I could get lucid all day and then go to bed and either be too tired to do the ■■■■ to help me lucid dream.

If you’ve ever related to that and you have LDs regularly now, what did you do?

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Actually I think enjoying your ND is one of the bigger steps you can take. People take too much time stressing LD’s and not realizing there are some amazingly vivid experiences if you just work on your dream recall. Deild could be a good candidate for you since you may be generally more aware when a dream has just ended compared to most.

This post was pleasantly more positive than I was expecting!

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Motivation is the number one problem that prevents people from having lucid dreams, I guess :lol: But it’s not all bad. If you feel you lack the energy to invest into lucid dreaming then simply don’t and also don’t beat yourself up over it. It’s perfectly fine to take a break. Many people even find it beneficial in the long run. So to summarize: Only do what you can bring yourself to do without losing fun and interest.


I wouldn’t worry about your NDs going away even if you invest heavily in lucid dreaming. You will always have them anyway and like Rhewin pointed out, they can totally make dreaming a worthwhile hobby all on their own, even without lucidity.

If you share this view then a consequence you really should consider is to give your normal dreams as much attention as your lucid dreams. Again Rhewin also pointed this out already. In many advertising and guides on LDs, normal dreams usually are not receiving a lot of love and are usually mentioned as a byproduct only. That makes sense from a marketing perspective because NDs will not sell as well as LDs so that’s what all the talk is about if you want to get wakers’ attention. But a lot of people also ultimately adopt this as their mindset, unfortunately.


A really simple solution is to simply sleep more. To most this will seem hard or impossible to do but in reality it all boils down to how much time in your daily schedule you allocate for sleeping. And that is a conscious choice made by you, it almost never is forced upon you by outside factors. You may disagree (don’t know your personal situation), but a possible and likely successful rebuttal then are “priorities“. Often people simply give other things a higher priority than sleeping and then complain that they don’t have enough time for sleeping. No, that’s not true! You could sleep more if you give it a higher priority. You can check for your own circumstances.

So it boils down to the question: Are your dreams and lucid dreaming less important to you than everything else you are occupying yourself with. If the answer is yes, then you will not be able to spend more time on sleep, but you won’t have to cry over it because you are now aware that it’s a conscious decision. If the answer is no, then take action and correct your schedule.

The advice above is of course only valid if more sleep could help your LD activities. I read your post as if that was the case, but if it’s not, then only keep the lesson so you can relay it to a friend in need ^^

To give an example with numbers: I need about 8 hours of sleep to refill my batteries. If I want to put effort into lucid dreaming, then I will make sure that I will get at least that much. If I want to put a lot of effort in (maybe because my motivation is at a peak), then I want 9 hours. And I actively check my schedule and plan the time. I don’t allow distractions to get in the way. If I am very busy with something that is important to me and I don’t even get 8h, then I know that I’m consciously cutting my sleep budget and will not be sad when my dreams suffer, because I chose to do so out of my own volition. Sleep and refreshment is in your own hands, always remember that you can make willful choices.

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